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Posts for tag: burning mouth syndrome

ThatPainfulIrritatingFeelingCouldbeBurningMouthSyndrome

For some time now you've noticed a painful, burning sensation in your mouth for no apparent reason. It doesn't matter what you eat or drink — or whether you eat or drink — the dry, tingling sensation seems to stay with you.

You may have Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS). You feel as if your mouth is scalded or burning generally or in a certain area like the lips, tongue or inside of the cheeks. Regardless, the discomfort (which seems to grow as the day wears on) can contribute to irritability, anxiety or depression.

It's not always easy to lock in on the specific cause. BMS has been linked, among other things, to diabetes, vitamin deficiencies, or cancer therapy. It's common among women around the age of menopause, so there's some speculation it could be affected by hormonal changes. It could also be connected with dry mouth (brought on by age or medications), an allergic reaction to toothpaste ingredients, acid reflux or autoimmune disorders.

While there's no single proven treatment for BMS, there are some things you can do to lessen its effects. First, stop habits that cause dry mouth like smoking, drinking alcohol or coffee and eating hot and spicy foods. Second, keep your mouth moist by frequently drinking water or using products that stimulate saliva flow.

You might also try toothpastes without sodium lauryl sulfate (a detergent that can cause skin peeling in some people), whiteners or strong flavorings like cinnamon. If you have chronic dry mouth, speak with your physician about any medications you're taking that might be causing it and seek alternatives. And because stress seems to magnify your symptoms, try to reduce it in your life through relaxation techniques, exercise or group support.

In some cases, BMS may resolve itself over time. In the mean time, making these lifestyle changes could help ease your discomfort.

If you would like more information on burning mouth syndrome, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Burning Mouth Syndrome: A Painful Puzzle.”

By Dr. Mark Shulman
September 25, 2016
Category: Oral Health
TreatingBurningMouthDependsonWhatsTriggeringit

There's a burning sensation in your mouth even though you haven't had anything hot to eat or drink. It's an experience you've had for years, often accompanied by mouth dryness, tingling or numbness that leaves you irritable, anxious or depressed.

The root causes for Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) remain elusive, although there appear to be links to diabetes, acid reflux, menopausal hormonal changes or even psychological issues. Although we may not be able to pinpoint the root cause we can identify contributing factors to BMS through a detailed oral examination and medical history (including drugs you're taking).

Mouth dryness is one of the most common factors for BMS. The lack of lubrication from adequate saliva flow can contribute substantially to the irritating burning sensation. There are a number of causes for mouth dryness, including as a side effect from many medications or other treatments.

We must also consider whether an allergic reaction — the body's over-reaction to a foreign substance — may have a role in your symptoms. Some people react to sodium lauryl sulfate, a foaming agent found in many types of toothpaste, along with whitening substances or flavorings like cinnamon; denture wearers can become allergic to the plastic materials used to construct the denture. These, as well as spicy foods, smoking or alcohol, can irritate or cause the tissues lining the inside of the mouth to peel.

Determining what factors contribute to your symptoms allows us to develop a treatment approach tailored to your situation. If, for example, we've determined your BMS stems from dry mouth as a side effect to medication, we can ask your doctor to prescribe an alternative, increase your water intake when taking pills or stimulate saliva flow. If we identify an allergen as a factor, you can eliminate the substance to reduce symptoms.

You may also need to make changes to your eating and lifestyle habits: stop smoking, reduce your alcohol or coffee consumption and avoid very hot or spicy foods. And look for ways to reduce stress, another contributing factor, through relaxation techniques, exercise or support groups.

It's possible that BMS will resolve itself over time. In the meantime, though, we can help you find ways to alleviate the irritation.

If you would like more information on diagnosing and treating BMS, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Burning Mouth Syndrome.”



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